english primary teacher

Course planning

(In the web Teaching English by the British Council)

Being able to plan well is one of the key skills that a teacher needs to have.  It involves being able to imagine what is going to happen in the classroom, and to make choices based on this imagined experience.  Planning also involves the ability to zoom out, to see the bigger picture and know how a 2 hour lesson fits into a 100 hour course, but it also involves the ability to zoom in, and work out the mechanics of how a 15 minute activity will work best.

Pre-service teacher training courses typically focus on the detailed planning of a 40 minute or 60 minute lesson and don’t focus attention on how to go about planning a much longer scheme of work.  This is also an important area to consider though, because most teachers are involved in teaching courses, which may typically last anywhere between 30 and 120 hours.

The aim of this article is to share some of the conclusions of a recent project I was part of, with the hope that it might enable other teachers to plan a little faster too!

Why do we plan our lessons?

I think that most teachers plan lessons in order to feel more confident in the class itself.  If we know what we’re trying to achieve in the lesson, we are freed up to spend more time with the learners rather than worrying about our next step.

The aim of planning is also to map out learning activities in a coherent, logical way, in order to help students understand, learn and practice concepts and skills which will develop their abilities in English.

When it comes to planning a whole scheme of work, it is important to ensure there is a balance of different skills work over the course.  We might also want to map out the areas of grammar and vocabulary that we intend to teach over the year, and plan a rough timetable for when we will introduce these concepts.

 

(You can follow reading the whole article here) 

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